Projects

SICOM - National Project Management Unit (NPMU)

SICOM, which is being set up as an independent society, and its operational systems, will help during the project period in setting up the coastal zone management division of MoEF. SICOM will provide leadership, guidance, approval, funds, facilities, and staff to the State Project Management Units.

Green Action for National Dandi Heritage Initiative (GANDHI)

The village of Dandi has not only a historical significance relating to the Dandi march but also is very important a location from the point of view of ecological conservation. It therefore, becomes imperative to preserve a village with so valuable a historical heritage, from adverse and fast changing tidal patterns and cyclonic conditions. The Ministry of Environment & Forests in collaboration with the Society for Integrated Coastal Zone Management and aided by the Gujarat Ecology Commission has undertaken the project for development of a green memorial at Dandi.

Goals

A Project for the Overall Development and Conservation of the Environment of Dandi and its surrounding villages based on Gandhian Teachings on Environmental Conservation and Village Development.

Objectives

Contribute towards increased understanding and acceptance of the need to protect, conserve and regenerate coastal natural resources by local communities and the government.

Contribute towards capacity building of coastal communities and government for community based bio-shield creation.

Project at a Glance
Start Date 7th July, 2010 End Date NA
Cost INR 2431.15 lakhs Funding Agency Ministry of Environment   Forests, Government of India
Implementing agencies Society for Integrated Coastal Management (SICOM) Gujarat Ecology Commission (GEC)
Components Conservation of the Coast and Coastal ResourcesAdopting Nature-based Development of ResourcesPromoting Integrated Village and Community Development Promoting Eco-Tourism and "Environment-Positive" Branding of Destination Dandi
Goal Contribute towards increased understanding and acceptance of the need to protect, conserve and regenerate coastal natural resources by local communities and the government Contribute towards capacity building of coastal communities and government for community based bio-shield creation Enhance the socio-economic conditions of the communities situated in and around the Dandi coastal belt.Prepare and implement the integrated environment management plan for Dandi and surrounding villages situated on the coastal belt Maintain historical value of Mahatma Gandhi and to promote Gandhian ideology on environmentPromote eco-tourism for the betterment of local communities
Contact SICOM/GEC

Enhance the socio-economic conditions of the communities situated in and around the - Dandi coastal belt.

Prepare and implement the integrated environment management plan for Dandi and surrounding villages situated on the coastal belt.

Maintain historical value of Mahatma Gandhi and to promote Gandhian ideology on environment.

Promote eco-tourism for the betterment of local communities.

Issues and Causes

The village of Dandi has not only a historical significance relating to the Dandi march but also is very important a location from the point of view of ecological conservation. It therefore, becomes imperative to preserve a village with so valuable a historical heritage, from adverse and fast changing tidal patterns and cyclonic conditions.

Currently, the village of Dandi is facing severe salinity problems due to high tidal influence, the impact of which can be seen in the transformation of fertile agricultural land into high salinity areas. There is therefore a need for conservation of Dandi by adopting natural biological methods of preservation.

Not only is Dandi facing the looming prospect of losing its fertile agricultural land to increased soil salinity, it is also prone to natural disasters in the form of a flurry of cyclones and storms. It therefore, is of utmost importance to create a bio-shield to protect the Dandi shoreline and the resident coastal communities from such untoward events.

Coastal ecologically important areas

  • coastal fresh water lakes

  • coral reefs

  • horse shoe crabs habitats

  • mangroves

  • marine parks and sanctuaries

  • coastal forests and wildlife

  • mudflats

  • nesting grounds of migratory birds

  • salt marshes

  • sand dunes

  • sea-grass beds

  • sea-weed beds

  • turtle nesting grounds

  • water bodies

Project Benefits

Intangible Benefits:

  • Enrichment of bio-diversity
  • Reduction of coastal erosion
  • Protection against natural calamities like cyclone, hurricane, tsunami, etc

Tangible Benefits

  • Increased livelihood opportunities through plantation and regeneration activities
  • Increased fodder availability for the livelistock rearers through alternative resource creation
  • The increase in mangrove area will also help the fishermen community by way of enhanced fishery resources in the near shore waters
  • Easy access to fuel wood and timber through sustainable mangrove harvest
  • Ownership feeling of project and idea
  • Benefit through tourism activities which will help socio-economic conditions
  • Creation of micro and small enterprises that can empower the community

Hazard Line Mapping

Mapping, delineation and demarcation of hazard line

Mapping, delineation and demarcation of the hazard lines, and delineation of coastal sediment cells and Ecologically Sensitive Areas (ESAs) all along the mainland coast of India. This will define the boundaries of the coastal zone in mainland India (which in turn will establish planning boundaries of the state/local ICZM plans) and will incorporate the effects of recurrent coastal hazards, including potential incremental effects induced by climate change (most notably sea level rise) within ICZM plans.

The Commission has also partnered with several Non-Governmental Organizations and Community-based Organizations in the State in a variety of projects related to ecological restoration, participatory management and awareness generation. GEC has carried out more than 6000 ha of Community-based Mangrove Plantation with the help of various organizations and industrial partnerships in the area of Gulf of Khambhat and Kachchh. The Commission is also involved in various environmental conservation activities on the coastal zone of the state. The Commission also takes up comprehensive environmental research studies.

Since the Swaminathan Committee recommendations, MoEF constituted an expert committee in 2006 to finalize the methodology of mapping and delineation of hazard line. The expert committee suggested a practical method of using topographic elevation, coastal flood heights including sea level rise effects, and coastal erosion data to determine the hazard line. The options and details were discussed at different forums through 2006-2008. During project preparation, several workshops were organized to reach a consensus among experts including scientists. The expert consensus was presented to stakeholders in each state, and the final methodologies were agreed. The hazard line for the mainland coast of India will be mapped and delineated as the landward composite of the coastal 100 year flood lines (which includes sea level rise impacts), and the 100 year predicted erosion lines. This will involve (i) surveys and preparation digital terrain model of 0.5m contour interval for the entire mainland coast; (ii) collection of historical tide gauge data and analyses to determine 100 year flood levels, (iii) analyses of maps and satellite imagery since 1967 to predict 100 year erosion line, (iv) preparation of composite maps, showing the hazard line on the digital terrain model, and (v) transfer of the hazard line to topographic maps for public dissemination. Once the hazard line is delineated, ground markers will be constructed. This is important as the revenue maps used for local planning purposes are not comparable to topographic maps. The publicly disseminated maps and the ground markers will obliterate the need for each developer and stakeholder to invest in physical surveys and interpretation each time a need for decision regarding applicability of coastal regulations arises. Once mapped and delineated the hazard lines will be used for coastal area planning.

Mapping, delineation and demarcation, as required, of the ESAs

Based on the recommendations of the Swaminathan Committee, a consultation-based study was undertaken during project preparation to define the type, nature and characteristics of ESAs to be demarcated. After expert and stakeholder consensus, the study recommended 15 different types of ESAs to be identified, mapped and delineated. The ESAs include: the currently protected national parks, wildlife sanctuaries (for most of which maps exist), mangroves, coral reefs, sea grass and sea weed beds, littoral forests, sea beaches, sand dunes, rocky cliffs, mud flats, lagoons, salt marshes, estuaries, and habitats of critical species such as the olive ridley turtles and the horse-shoe crab. Detailed methods to determine the ecological richness of each of these had been defined. Following these methods, the ESAs will be identified and delineated. Once these are delineated, boundaries of ESAs will be transferred to topographical maps, prepared for hazard line delineation. Contiguous areas containing these ESAs within the coastal zone will be focus of ICZM plans.

Setting up of the new national institute for coastal zone management

During project preparation a study was undertaken for designing the program for the national institute. The study included analyses of ICZM skill gaps in the country. Scientific, legal and technological gaps and the skill requirements were identified for relevant areas such as physical, chemical and biological oceanography; coastal geology and geomorphology; coastal engineering; capture and culture fishery; coastal and seabed resources; coastal ecology and environment; regional planning; ecosystem management; strategic environmental analysis; environmental assessment; integrated coastal zone management; marine area management; traditional wisdom, social and cultural anthropology of the coastal communities; and the development need of coastal communities. This was followed by a capacity analysis which identified the needs for enhanced expertise and human resources; institutional framework and legal/policy climate to use the available skills; and enhancement in physical and financial resources, as the key gaps for knowledge and capacity building program. Based on the study results, stakeholder discussions, and as per recommendations of the Swaminathan Committee, the proposed National Center for Sustainable Coastal Zone Management (NCSCM) will develop and promote international best practices and approaches for integrated coastal zone management in India.

Capacity building of MoEF

An analysis of the current capacity constraints of MoEF was undertaken to assess the extent to which it can play a role as the secretariat to NCZMA. A further analysis was undertaken to identify capacity building needs necessitated by the proposed shift to an efficient ICZM approach. Based on this analysis, and consultation with NCZMA and the coastal states, a capacity building plan was prepared. [The following are scheduled to be completed before appraisal] - (1) Proposals on staffing (skills mix, job descriptions including setting up of functional units within), equipment, office space and such other operational needs and other operational and implementation arrangements. (2) Investment and operating budget needs and timetable for implementing the institutional changes. Note that a part of the capacity building needs will be fulfilled by the implementation of the project itself.

Project Management

This will support staffing and operation of the national project management unit (NPMU); establishing adequate financial management and procurement management systems; implementation of communication plan and RTI related activities; implementation of governance and accountability actions; M&E and third party audits; coordination meetings with states and other stakeholder engagement; and special evaluation studies. It is expected that the NPMU, which is being set up as an independent society will be transformed during the project implementation period into the coastal zone management division of MoEF, as per the MoEF capacity building plan. Most of the systems set up for project management, such as the financial management and procurement systems and the M&E systems will therefore be incorporated into the medium term capacity building plan.

About State Project Management Unit

The first phase of the project covers the States of Gujarat, Orissa and West Bengal. The SPMUs will ensure preparation and adoption of the ICZM plan through a process of regular stakeholder dialogue, scientific and technical input support, resource endowments, potential coastal hazards and risks to coastal communities. It will define implementation arrangements, the M&E and plan review mechanisms, detailed measures for resource generation, and all relevant and social and environmental mitigation methods.

View project information

Integrated Coastal Zone Management Project – List of states

State Project in Gujarat – Gulf of Kachchh

  • State Project Management Unit
  • ICZM Plan, SPMU
  • Coastal geo-spatial information system
  • Socio-economic development of villages
  • Mangrove restoration
  • Mangrove restoration, Marine National Park
  • Mangrove-coral reef regeneration, MNP
  • Marine oceanarium
  • Ecotourism& livelihood improvement
  • Coral transplantation
  • Underground sewerage system, JMC
  • Monitoring of Gulf of Kuchh, GPCB

State Project in Orissa : Paradeep–Dhamra and Gopalpur-Chilka

  • State Project Management Unit
  • ICZM plan preparation
  • Regional coastal studies
  • Capacity building wetland species research, CDA
  • Construction of embankment at Pentha Village
  • Capacity building Orissa State Pollution Control Board
  • Fisheries based livelihood option
  • Conservation archaeological and cultural assets (8 sites)
  • Construction of Multipurpose Cyclone Shelters
  • Livelihood Improvement through alternate option
  • Tourism-based livelihood opportunity
  • Establishment of solid waste landfill
  • Mangroves Plantation and Protection of Wildlife
  • Ecotourism Bhitarkanika, Gahirmatha, Chilika

State Project in West Bengal - Sagar Island, Digha - Shankarpur

  • State project management unit
  • ICZM plan preparation, SPMU
  • Capacity building, E&F department and SPMU
  • Development of ecotourism
  • 100 % household electrification in Sagar
  • Afforestation programme towards coastal protection
  • Marine aquarium cum research centre, Digha,
  • Renovation of sanitary sewerage scheme for Digha area
  • Post harvest handling and fish auction centre at Digha Mohana
  • Beach cleaning& sanitation, beach beautification
  • Solid waste management
  • Development of drainage system
  • Livelihood improvements & market access in Sagar Island
  • Capacity building for remote sensing & GIS laboratory
  • Capacity building for ICZM with regard to climate change studies
  • Construction of cyclone shelter facilities in Sunderban

NCSCM

The July 2009 Swaminathan Committee Report - "FINAL FRONTIER" proposed an Agenda to protect the ecosystem and habitat of India's coast for conservation and livelihood security". Some of the major recommendations of the Report include

  • Coastal Zone Management approach shall be based on an integrated approach keeping in view the diversity of coast
  • Development along the coastal stretches based on the hazard line, taking into consideration flooding and erosion
  • Inclusion of the ocean zone
  • Setting up of Institute for Coastal Zone Management to address the policy and legal issues
  • Address the pollution of coastal areas and its water in a in a time bound manner
  • Identify and map all the coastal eco-sensitive areas such as mangroves, corals, turtle breeding areas, etc. areas and protect them
  • Develop bioshield along the coastal stretches
  • A separate management plan for Islands

The Committee its Report "Final Frontier" advised the Ministry to set aside the Notification, but strengthen the Coastal Regulation Zone Notification, 1991 by incorporating various recommendations listed in the Report

View project information

Agenda for the Future

  • Introduce measures to greatly strengthen research and regulatory capacity at all levels
  • Emphasis on the need for Institutions for Coastal Research
  • Strengthen current regulatory institutions at the Centre and at the State for better decision-making
  • Recommendations were made for establishing a new institution for Coastal Zone Management
  • At the present time, no single institution has such a "holistic focus" to address these complex coastal issues - hence the “need to establish” such an institution assumes great significance

Introduction to NCSCM

Based on the above facts, the MoEF in collaboration with Anna University Chennai established the National Centre for Sustainable Coastal Management, with the following primary goals

  • The aim is to create a world class institution for sustainable coastal management with a strong research and knowledge base
  • Create a Consortium of Institutions in India to strengthen capacity in multi-disciplinary research related to coastal management

Divisions of NCSCM:

Projects of NCSCM:

Back to Top